Using NuGet for commercial libraries

Dec 7, 2010 at 10:44 PM
Edited Dec 7, 2010 at 10:45 PM

Awesome framework. Two questions related to commercial use of NuGet;

  1. Am I allowed to use NuGet for (trial versions of) commercial closed-source libraries?
  2. If I want to host my own commercial package feed on my server, is NuPack.Server the only way to go? NuPack.Server comes with a boatload of dependencies I do not want on my server. I just want to host a static feed, is that possible?

    It looks like CTP 1 supported some Atom based feed, am I correct in that it has been abandoned in CTP 2? 

 

Thanks.

 - Koen

Coordinator
Dec 7, 2010 at 10:50 PM

1. Yes. You can put any library up on NuGet as long as you have the rights to put it up there.

2. You can hand edit a static feed if you want, but I think it would be tricky as we’re using the OData format. We no longer support the ATOM feed.

From: kozw [mailto:notifications@codeplex.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 3:45 PM
To: Phil Haack
Subject: Using NuGet for commercial libraries [nuget:237523]

From: kozw

Awesome framework. Two questions related to commercial use of NuGet;

1. Is it allowed to use NuGet for commercial closed-source libraries?

2. If I want to host my own commercial package feed on my server, is NuPack.Server the only way to go? NuPack.Server comes with a boatload of dependencies I do not want on my server. I just want to host a static feed, is that possible?

It looks like CTP 1 supported some Atom based feed, am I correct in that it has been abandoned in CTP 2?

Thanks.

- Koen

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Developer
Dec 7, 2010 at 10:53 PM

You could host your packages on a shared drive / network drive and point to it. The disadvantage of doing this is that you miss out on server side caching and filtering. If you aren’t dealing with a great many packages, the performance loss shouldn’t be perceptible.

From: Haacked [mailto:notifications@codeplex.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 3:51 PM
To: Pranav Krishnamoorthy
Subject: Re: Using NuGet for commercial libraries [nuget:237523]

From: Haacked

1. Yes. You can put any library up on NuGet as long as you have the rights to put it up there.

2. You can hand edit a static feed if you want, but I think it would be tricky as we’re using the OData format. We no longer support the ATOM feed.

From: kozw [mailto:notifications@codeplex.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 3:45 PM
To: Phil Haack
Subject: Using NuGet for commercial libraries [nuget:237523]

From: kozw

Awesome framework. Two questions related to commercial use of NuGet;

1. Is it allowed to use NuGet for commercial closed-source libraries?

2. If I want to host my own commercial package feed on my server, is NuPack.Server the only way to go? NuPack.Server comes with a boatload of dependencies I do not want on my server. I just want to host a static feed, is that possible?

It looks like CTP 1 supported some Atom based feed, am I correct in that it has been abandoned in CTP 2?

Thanks.

- Koen

Read the full discussion online.

To add a post to this discussion, reply to this email (nuget@discussions.codeplex.com@discussions.codeplex.com)

To start a new discussion for this project, email nuget@discussions.codeplex.com@discussions.codeplex.com

You are receiving this email because you subscribed to this discussion on CodePlex. You can unsubscribe or change your settings on codePlex.com.

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Read the full discussion online.

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Dec 7, 2010 at 11:05 PM

Woah, ultra-fast responses. Appreciate that.

I'm looking into hosting a public feed over http, network drives are not an option. Will see if a static odata feed is doable.

- Koen

Dec 7, 2010 at 11:22 PM

You wrote "NuPack.Server comes with a boatload of dependencies I do not want on my server".  Is that really the case?  You should not have to add anything to your GAC, and everything should be able to run from bin, which would have no global effect on your server.

You can't have a static OData feed.  It needs to be able to respond to queries from our client.

Dec 7, 2010 at 11:37 PM

We want to merge some lightweight package service into our existing company server and keep the number of dependencies as low as possible. The NuGet.Server includes Elmah, Ninject, MVC, etc. We currently do not use those and want to avoid it if possible.

What I need is a lightweight package service or the re-introduction of Atom. Was there a specific reason for dropping Atom support?

Coordinator
Dec 8, 2010 at 12:41 AM
Why would you not want to use those? As David points out, they don't need to be "installed" to the GAC. All you need installed in your server is ASP.NET 4. Everything else runs from the bin so you can effectively "x-copy" deploy the project.

OData builds on top of ATOM but adds querying, which is something we needed so we could run arbitrary queries against the feed. This allows filtering the feed on the server which helps perf when the # of packages get large.
Dec 8, 2010 at 7:33 AM
I'm a little confused with your message as well. It might just be me, but your message comes across a little presumptuous seeming to dictate what dependencies a free third party application should use. If I am misreading and this was not the intended message, then ignore the rest of my statements.

If the dependency chain is a deal breaker, no worries, mate. The product has dependencies for it to run and they are all self-contained. You drop them somewhere then put your packages in next to the server files. Pretty easy and awesome from my experience.

It could be more that I don't understand what you mean by "merge" into your "server." I usually don't hear merge and server in the same sentence when I think of server in the context of a computer.
Dec 8, 2010 at 12:23 PM

I have an IIS website running a older proprietary CMS on .NET v2.0 and I would love to add a NuGet package service. I'm certainly not saying that free 3rd-party apps should or should not use certain dependencies. I'm just trying to figure out what my options are given the current website constraints. A static ATOM feed would solve my problem, but I understand why ATOM feeds are dropped in favor of an OData service for filtering and ordering.

Dec 8, 2010 at 1:20 PM

So the only real barrier, rather mental though, I see is .NET 4.0 support on the server. If .NET 4 is not an option for any reason, just go with a static OData feed. Just make sure your server sends the static feed back to any permutation of query parameters. Beware that your clients will lose some UX.

If .NET 4 is OK, just ILMerge the server EXE and forget about dependencies.